Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Baseball Names – How They Came To Be By Harvey Frommer

Baseball Names –How They Came To Be - By Harvey Frommer

The words and phrases are spoken and written day after day, year after year -

generally without any wonderment as to how they became part of the language.

All have a history, a story.

With the 2017 edition of spring training to beging and another season to follow, a

brief sampler follows of some of the singular baseball names follow:

AMAZIN' METS The first run they ever scored came in on a balk. They lost the

first nine games they ever played. They finished last their first four seasons. Once

they were losing a game, 12-1, and there were two outs in the bottom of the ninth

inning. A fan held up a sign that said "PRAY!" There was a walk, and ever

hopeful, thousands of voices chanted, "Let's go Mets." They were 100-l underdogs

to win the pennant in 1969 and incredibly came on to finish the year as World

Champions. They picked the name of the best pitcher in their history (Tom

Seaver) out of a hat on April Fools' Day. They were supposed to be the

replacement for the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants. They could have

been the New York Continentals or Burros or Skyliners or Skyscrapers or Bees or

Rebels or NYB's or Avengers or even Jets (all  runner-up names in a contest to tab

the National League New York team that began playing ball in 1962). They've

never been anything to their fans but amazing-the Amazin' New York Mets.

BIG POISON and LITTLE POISON Paul Waner's rookie year with the Pittsburgh

Pirates was 1926, when he batted .336 and led the league in triples. In one game

he cracked out six hits using six different bats. In 1927 the second Waner arrived,

brother Lloyd. For 14 years, the Waners formed a potent brother combination in

the Pittsburgh lineup. Paul was 5'8l/2'' and weighed 153 pounds. Lloyd was 5'9"

and weighed 150 pounds.

Paul was dubbed Big Poison even though he was smaller than Lloyd, who was

called Little Poison. An older brother even then had privileges. But both players

were pure poison for National League pitchers. Slashing left-handed line-drive

hitters, the Waners collected 5,611 hits between them. Paul's lifetime batting

average was .333, and he recorded three batting titles. Lloyd posted a career

average of .316. They played a combined total of 38 years in the major leagues.

BONEHEAD MERKLE The phrase "pulling a bonehead play," or "pulling a

boner," is not only part of the language of baseball, but of all sports and in fact, of

the language in general. Its most dramatic derivation goes back to September 9,

1908. Frederick Charles Merkle, a.k.a. George Merkle, was playing his first full

game at first base for the New York Giants. It was his second season in the

majors; the year before, he had appeared in 15 games. The Giants were in first

place and the Cubs were challenging them. The two teams were tied, 1-1, in the

bottom of the ninth inning. With two outs, the Giants' Moose McCormick was on

third base and Merkle was on first. Al Bridwell slashed a single to center field, and

McCormick crossed the plate with what was apparently the winning run. Merkle,

eager to avoid the Polo Grounds crowd that surged onto the playing field, raced

directly to the clubhouse instead of following through on the play and touching

second base. Amid the pandemonium, Johnny Evers of the Cubs screamed for the

baseball, obtained it somehow, stepped on second base, and claimed a forceout on

Merkle. When things subsided, umpire Hank O'Day agreed with Evers. The

National League upheld O'Day, Evers and the Cubs, so the run was nullified and

the game not counted. Both teams played out their schedules and completed the

season tied for first place  with 98 wins and 55 losses. A replay of the game was

scheduled, and Christy Mathewson, seeking his 38th victory of the season, lost, 4-

2, to Three-Finger Brown (q.v.). The Cubs won the pennant. Although Merkle

played 16 years in the majors and had a lifetime batting average of .273, he will

forever be rooted in sports lore as the man who made the "bonehead" play that lost

the 1908 pennant for the Giants, for had he touched second base there would have

been no replayed game and the Giants would have won the pennant by one game.

"B0O” Name for a day in 1979 of Giants shortstop Johnnie LeMaster, who heard

the boo-birds in San Fran. He took his field position wearing "Boo" on his back.

LeMaster switched back to his regular jersey after one game.

"CHILI"  When he was about 12 years old, Charles Davis was given a not too

attractive haircut which led to his getting the nickname "Chili Bowl," later

shortened to "Chili" as the boy became the man and the baseball player "Chili"

Davis.

GIANTS  One sultry summer's day in 1885, Jim Mutrie, the

saber-mustached manager of the New York Gothams, was enjoying himself

watching his team winning an important game. Mutrie screamed out with

affection, "My big fellows, my giants." Many of his players were big fellows, and

they came to be Giants. For that was how the nickname Giants came to be. And

when the New York team left for San Francisco in 1958, Giants, Mutrie's

endearing nickname, went along with it.

SPLENDID SPLINTER He was also nicknamed the Thumper, because of the

power with which he hit the ball, and the Kid, because of his tempestuous attitude-

but his main nickname was perhaps the most appropriate. Ted Williams was one

of the most splendid players who ever lived, and he could really "splinter" the ball.

The handsome slugger compiled a lifetime batting average of .344 and a slugging

percentage of .634.

Williams blasted 521 career home runs, scored nearly 1,800 runs, and drove in

over 1,800 runs. So keen was his batting eye that he walked over 2,000 times

while striking out only 709 times. In 1941 he batted .406 - the last time any player

hit .400 or better. One of the most celebrated moments in the career of the Boston

Red Sox slugger took place in the 1946 All-Star Game. Williams came to bat

against Rip Sewell and his celebrated "eephus" (blooper) pitch. Williams had

already walked in the game and hit a home run. Sewell's pitch came to the plate in

a high arc, and Williams actually trotted out to the pitch, bashing it into the right-

field bullpen for a home run. "That was the first homer ever hit off the pitch,"

Sewell said later.

"The ball came to the plate in a twenty-foot arc," recalled Williams. "I didn't know

whether I'd be able to get enough power into that kind of a pitch for a  home run."

There was no kind of pitch Williams couldn't hit for a home run.

*********************************************************

Coming this fall from your favorite author: (Pre-order)

https://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Yankee- Book-Beginning-

Today_Essential/dp/1624144330

Dr. Harvey Frommer, a professor at Dartmouth College in the MALS program, is in his 4ist year of writing books. A noted oral historian and sports journalist, he is the author of 43 sports books including the classics: best-selling “New York City Baseball, 1947-1957″ and best-selling Shoeless Joe and Ragtime Baseball,as well as his acclaimed Remembering Yankee Stadium and best-selling Remembering Fenway Park. His highly praised When It Was Just a Game: Remembering the First Super Bowl was published last fall.

A link to purchase autographed copies of Frommer Sports Books is at:   http://frommerbooks.com/

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

From the First to Super Bowl 51 - By Harvey Frommer

From the First to Super Bowl 51

By Harvey Frommer




The very long National Football League season is now over.  Now we all

look ahead to “the ultimate game.”  Hype, hoopla, histrionics and sometimes a

great game is the result of all the activity.


The Super Bowl is America at its best and also America at its worst. American

conspicuous consumption. American grossness. American fandom, American

power. American marketing. American ingenuity. American skills and talent. All

are on parade, all turned up, tuned in at the same time for the same event. All of

that is the greatest power and the greatest weakness of the big game.

Played in the dead of winter in the United States across various time zones,

the “Super Bowl” on “Super Sunday” has become a de facto American holiday,

right up there with Christmas, New Year’s Eve, Thanksgiving and the Fourth of

July. For many, better.


How it all came to be is in many ways more fascinating than

whatit has become. The merger of the American Football League and the

National Football League led to the need for a championship game. The first

contest was played on January 15, 1967 The Vince Lombardi Green Bay

Packers squared off against the Kansas City Chiefs.

And, although the contest was officially known as the AFL-NFL World

Championship, its unofficial name - the Super Bowl - was used in the media,

the fans and the players, and the name stuck.


One theory for how the high flying name came about is that at an

owner's meeting centered on what to call the game, owner Lamar Hunt had a

"super ball" in his pocket that he had taken away from his youngster earlier

in the day. Hunt was not too taken with the long and ordinary sounding

suggestions for what would become professional football's ultimate game.

As the story goes, squeezing the ball, he suggested the name “Super

Bowl.” His suggestion was not greeted with much enthusiasm by the

assembled group. Nevertheless, he mentioned the name to a reporter who

loved it and, as they say, the rest is history.


That first game witnessed the first dual-network, color-coverage

simulcast of a sports event in history, and attracted the largest viewership to

ever see a sporting event up to that time. The Nielsen rating indicated that 73

million fans watched all or part of the game on one of the two networks,

CBS or NBC.


In actuality, the game was a contest between the two leagues and the two

networks. CBS' allegiance was to the NFL. NBC's loyalty was to the AFL - a

league it had virtually created with its network dollars.


From the start there were special features to the Super Bowl including its

designation with a Roman numeral rather than by a year - a move on the part

of NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle to give the contest a sense of class.

That first Super Bowl was played at the Memorial Coliseum in Los

Angeles before 61,946. Quarterback Bart Starr was the first Most Valuable

Player as he led the Packers to a 35-10 victory over Kansas City. Starr

completed 16-of- 23 passes for 250 yards and three touchdowns.

Max McGee of the Packers became an interesting footnote to Super

Bowl history.


"I knew I wouldn't play unless (Boyd) Dowler got hurt," he said in later

years.


So McGee went out on the town the days (and nights) prior to the game.

Curfews, it seems, were there for him to break. He stayed out until 7:30 a.m.

on the day of the game. Then, the unimaginable happened. Dowler suffered

a separated shoulder throwing a block on the opening series.

In came the 11-year veteran McGee who had caught only four passes all

season. He snared 7 passes for 138 yards. McGee and Starr hooked up in the

first quarter for a 37-yard score, and again at the end of the third quarter for

a 13-yard touchdown. Elijah Pitts ran for two other scores. The Chiefs' 10

points came in the second quarter, their only touchdown on a 7-yard pass

from Len Dawson to Curtis McClinton.


But Max McGee stole the show and set a pattern in that first Super

Bowl that would be part of the ultimate game's history of unlikely heroes,

strange twists of fate, footballs taking a wrong bounce for some teams and

the right bounce for others.


Who knows what history holds in store for 2017’s Super Bowl?



Dr. Harvey Frommer, a professor at Dartmouth College in the MALS program, is in his 4ist year of writing books. A noted oral historian and sports journalist, he is the author of 43 sports books including the classics: best-selling “New York City Baseball, 1947-1957″ and best-selling Shoeless Joe and Ragtime Baseball,as well as his acclaimed Remembering Yankee Stadium and best-selling Remembering Fenway Park. His highly praised When It Was Just a Game: Remembering the First Super Bowl was published last fall.

A link to purchase autographed copies of Frommer Sports Books is at:   http://frommerbooks.com/

Sunday, January 29, 2017

Jackie Robinson Moments By Harvey Frommer

Jackie Robinson Moments

By Harvey Frommer


             
Jack Roosevelt Robinson was born on January 31, 1919 in Cairo, Georgia. He remains for me and so many others one of the most important figures in sports and American history. 
My newest book billed a Harvey Frommer Baseball Classic was just published.  http://www.lyonspress.com/book/9781630761578

While there were a few black players in the 1880s and a few others with African-American blood were described by their teams as "Cuban," "Mexican" or "Indian" in the first part of the 20th century, it was Jackie Robinson who shattered the color barrier post-World War II.
The struggle to break the color line in the Major Leagues included many sorry stories like this one from July 27, 1943. Wire services announced that three Negro National League players would be given tryouts with the Pittsburgh Pirates. But, the three Roy Campanella, Sam Hughes of the Baltimore Elite Giants and Dave Barnhill of the New York Cubans -- never received their tryouts.


                  
                   Farcical Tryouts at Fenway Park
           Each season, the Boston Red Sox had routinely received a waiver from the Boston City Council permitting them to play Sunday baseball. Now Councilman Isadore Muchnick, who represented the Mattapan section of Boston, teamed with African-American journalist Wendell Smith.  They had an offer for Tom Yawkey that they knew he could not refuse. A trade, of sorts.
 For the BoSox to keep the long-held waiver in place, the team would have to allow three black baseball prospects to try out at Fenway Park. Yawkey, as the story was reported later, reluctantly agreed to the tryouts of Jackie Robinson, Marvin Williams and Sam Jethroe. His one condition was that all decisions about them would be the province of his baseball people.
Black ballplayers from the Negro Leagues from time to time had played at Fenway when the Red Sox were on the road. The color barrier was firmly in effect at this time, but owners thought nothing of picking up spare change through this business arrangement. Now they would have chance to break the big club’s color line at Fenway Park, or so was the understanding.
April 16, 1945 began damp and drizzly. At about 10:00 A.M. Muchnick and Smith were in the stands, They watched as the tryout got underway.  Just back from army service in World War II, Jackie Robinson was set to play with the Kansas City Monarchs in the Negro Leagues that season.  Marvin Williams was a member of the Philadelphia Stars. Sam Jethroe was an outfielder for the Cleveland Buckeyes.       
          Red Sox Manager Joe Cronin sat in the stands, according to one account, “stone-faced.'' Eddie Collins, the general manager, reportedly was unable to attend the tryout “because of a previous engagement.” 



Near the end of the one-hour workout, according to Clifford Keane, reporter for the Boston Globe, someone called out, “Get those niggers off the field!”
Boston Red Sox immortal and Coach Hugh Duffy, 78, was one of those who conducted the workouts. Later that year he would be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.  “You boys look like pretty good players,” he was quoted as saying. “I hope you enjoyed the workout.”  Later he remarked: “After one workout, it was not possible to judge their ability."
When the tryout was over, Robinson said:  “It was April, 1945. Nobody was serious about black players in the majors, except maybe for a few politicians.”
According to United Press International, Jethroe and Williams “seemed tense and both their hitting and fielding suffered.” According to the Red Sox front office, the players were not ready for the majors and would not be comfortable playing for the team's Triple-A affiliate in Louisville, Kentucky.
According to Sam Jethroe, the entire experience was “a sham.”  The Red Sox front office would never contact the players.
There was a need for players with the abilities of Jethroe, Robinson and Williams. As the 1945 baseball season began and the war still raged, Major League rosters were stocked with not quite ready for prime time players, a few underage ones and quite a few who were long in the tooth. But the game went on at Fenway Park in 1945 and other big league venues, as it had always gone on, only with white players.
          By April of 1947, there were sixteen blacks in organized baseball, half of them in the Dodger organization. Branch Rickey had signed Dan Bankhead who would pitch ten innings late in the season. John Wright, Roy Parlow, Don Newcombe, and Roy Campanella were in the minor leagues Hank Thompson and Willard J. Brown would join the St. Louis Browns in July.   
The Cleveland Indians had signed Larry Doby in 1947, and he would play in twenty-nine games for them.
          But Jackie Robinson was the main man, the first of the black stars who would change forever the way things were in Major League Baseball. He was history's wall-breaker, history’s messenger.      



The Pee Wee Reese Moment
As the story goes, during Robinson’s rookie season his southern-born teammate Pee Wee Reese stood up for him at a game in Cincinnati after hearing racial slurs. The little shortstop allegedly put his arm around Robinson and said, “You can hate a man for many reasons. Color is not one of them,”

There is a statue of Reese and Robinson outside the playing field of the Brooklyn Cyclones in Coney Island to commemorate that moment in time that probably never took place. Rachel Robinson was opposed to that statue suggesting another moment be found. Her opposition went unheeded. There is no mention in newspapers, and according to Newsweek no mention of it can be unearthed. Ken Burns, creator of the documentary on Robinson, calls the moment “mythology.”

Dr. Harvey Frommer, a professor at Dartmouth College in the MALS program, is in his 4ist year of writing books. A noted oral historian and sports journalist, he is the author of 43 sports books including the classics: best-selling “New York City Baseball, 1947-1957″ and best-selling Shoeless Joe and Ragtime Baseball,as well as his acclaimed Remembering Yankee Stadium and best-selling Remembering Fenway Park. His highly praised When It Was Just a Game: Remembering the First Super Bowl was published last fall.

A link to purchase autographed copies of Frommer Sports Books is at:   http://frommerbooks.com/

Sunday, January 22, 2017

What I Learned Writing WHEN IT WAS JUST A GAME: REMEMBERING THE FIRST SUPER BOWL By Harvey Frommer

What I Learned Writing

WHEN IT WAS JUST A GAME: REMEMBERING THE FIRST SUPER BOWL

By Harvey Frommer



With the 2017 Super Bowl almost upon us, how it all began is recounted in

chapter and verse in my WHEN IT WAS JUST A GAME: REMEMBERING THE

FIRST SUPER BOWL, an oral history. Below follows just some of the fascinating

things I learned.

Other rivals to the NFL through the decades had sprung up:

American Football League (1926), American Football League (1936–1937),

American Football League (1940–1941), All-America Football Conference

(1946–1949). None of them had the financial muscle and the organizational

skills behind them that Lamar Hunt’s American Football League had.

One of Commissioner Pete Rozelle’s suggestions for the name of the new

game was “The Big One.” That name never caught on. “Pro Bowl,” did not

work. “World Series of Football.” That died quickly. It was deemed too

imitative of baseball’s Fall Classic.

Quarterback Bart Starr of the Packers on Vince Lombardi: “It was a

fabulous experience all of us had playing for him, being coached by him. I

could hardly wait for the next morning to get into the meeting to start that

day off. He made everything so exciting, so challenging. He was a brilliant

teacher and because of it he was a fabulous coach.”

KC player Ed Lothamer said of Kansas City Coach Hank Stram: “There

were times when he had practices and a band playing. If an entertainer or

celebrity was in Kansas City, often they would call Hank, and Hank would

invite them to come over and watch practice. People like Muhammad Ali,

Jim Nabors, Al Hirt, Edie Gorme and Steve Lawrence, all watched us

practice. You never knew who was going to pop up.”

Prior to that first Super Bowl Game on January 15, 1967 the Packers and the

Chiefs had never played against each other. Actually, no NFL team had ever

played against an AFL team—not even an exhibition game.  

The Saturday night before the game even chubby Jackie Gleason, one of the

famed comedians of that era, got into the act by ending his CBS television

urging his huge audience to make sure to tune in the next day to CBS and

watch the world championship football game.

  “It’s gonna be murder!” Gleason bellowed

          There were those who thought “The Great One” went a bit too far, that he

was too much of a shill for his CBS network that carried the NFL broadcasts.

Some celebrities of the time at the game included: famed movie and TV

stars Henry Fonda, Kirk Douglas, June Allyson, Janet Leigh, Chuck

Connors, Danny Thomas, CBS TV anchor Walter Cronkite, comedian and

serious sports fan Bob Hope, late night TV host Johnny Carson.

Two different footballs were used in the game. When the NFL Packers were

on offense, they used the NFL ball and when the AFL Chiefs were on

offense, the AFL ball was used.

Two kick-offs incredibly took place to start the game’s second half because

NBC-TV was in commercial for the first one and a “do over” was allowed.

Commissioner Pete Rozelle’s wish was that the game would one day surpass

baseball’s World Series. It would do much more than that.

With that first game history – The Super Bowl has evolved into the grandest,

grossest, gaudiest annual one-day spectacle in the annals of American sports and

culture. All of this incredibly spun off the game that was played that January day in

1967 at the Los Angeles Coliseum, a game that for a time lacked a name, a venue,

an identity, a game that didn’t even sell out.

Now available: http://frommerbooks.com/when-it- was-just- a-game.html

Dr. Harvey Frommer, a professor at Dartmouth College in the MALS program, is in his 4ist year of writing books. A noted oral historian and sports journalist, he is the author of 43 sports books including the classics: best-selling “New York City Baseball, 1947-1957″ and best-selling Shoeless Joe and Ragtime Baseball,as well as his acclaimed Remembering Yankee Stadium and best-selling Remembering Fenway Park. His highly praised When It Was Just a Game: Remembering the First Super Bowl was published last fall.

A link to purchase autographed copies of Frommer Sports Books is at:   http://frommerbooks.com/

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

IBWAA SELECTS VLADIMIR GUERRERO AND IVAN RODRIGUEZ IN 2017 HALL OF FAME VOTE

IBWAA SELECTS VLADIMIR GUERRERO AND IVAN RODRIGUEZ IN 2017 HALL OF FAME VOTE
 
Los Angeles – In its eighth annual Hall of Fame election, the IBWAA selected Vladimir Guerrero and Ivan Rodriguez, both with 84.54% of the vote (175 votes). A 75% threshold is required for election.
 
Mike Mussina came up one vote short, finishing in third place with 74.88%, followed by Trevor Hoffman (73.91%), Barry Bonds (73.43%) and Roger Clemens (71.50%). There are 470 members in the IBWAA; 208 voted in this election.
 
Jeff Bagwell (2015), Edgar Martinez (2016) and Tim Raines (2015) did not appear on the 2017 IBWAA Hall of Fame ballot because they have already been honored in previous IBWAA elections.
 
With those exceptions, the IBWAA ballot was identical to the one used by the BBWAA. All voting is done electronically.
 
Per a group decision in January, 2014, the IBWAA allows members to vote for up to 15 players, instead of the previous 10, beginning with the 2015 election. In the 2017 election, 92 members voted for 10 or more candidates. Seventeen members voted for 15 candidates. The average vote per member was 8.94.
 
Complete voting results are as follows:
 
 
Player Name
Votes
Percentage
Iván Rodríguez
175
84.54%
Vladimir Guerrero
175
84.54%
Mike Mussina
155
74.88%
Trevor Hoffman
153
73.91%
Barry Bonds
152
73.43%
Roger Clemens
148
71.50%
Curt Schilling
120
57.97%
Larry Walker
117
56.52%
Manny Ramírez
109
52.66%
Gary Sheffield
91
43.96%
Fred McGriff
85
41.06%
Billy Wagner
84
40.58%
Jeff Kent
80
38.65%
Sammy Sosa
68
32.85%
Lee Smith
65
31.40%
Jorge Posada
32
15.46%
Tim Wakefield
8
3.86%
Jason Varitek
7
3.38%
Matt Stairs
6
2.90%
Magglio Ordóñez
5
2.42%
Edgar Rentería
4
1.93%
Arthur Rhodes
2
0.97%
Derrek Lee
2
0.97%
J.D. Drew
2
0.97%
Pat Burrell
2
0.97%
Casey Blake
1
0.48%
Melvin Mora
1
0.48%
Mike Cameron
1
0.48%
Carlos Guillén
0
0.00%
Freddy Sánchez
0
0.00%
Orlando Cabrera
0
0.00%
 
Ballot tabulations by Brian Wittig & Associates.
 
The IBWAA was established July 4, 2009 to organize and promote the growing online baseball media, and to serve as a digital alternative to the Baseball Writers’ Association of America (BBWAA). Voting for full season awards takes place in September of each year, with selections being announced in November. The IBWAA also holds a Hall of Fame election in December of each year, with results being announced the following January.
 
In 2010, the IBWAA began voting in its own relief pitcher category, establishing the Rollie Fingers American League Relief Pitcher of the Year and the Hoyt Wilhelm National League Relief Pitcher of the Year Awards.
 
Among others, IBWAA members include Jim Bowden and David Schoenfield of ESPN.com; Tim Brown, Yahoo! Sports; Craig Calcaterra, NBC Sports Hardball Talk; Bill Chuck, GammonsDaily.com; Derrick Goold, St. Louis Post-Dispatch; Jon Heyman and Jesse Spector, Today’s Knuckleball; Danny Knobler, Bleacher Report; Kevin Kennedy; Kostya Kennedy, Sports Illustrated; Will Leitch, Sports on Earth; Bruce Markusen, Hardball Times; Ross Newhan; Dayn Perry and Matt Snyder, CBSSports.com; Tom Hoffarth and J.P. Hoornstra Los Angeles Daily News; Pedro Moura, Los Angeles Times; Tracy Ringolsby, MLB.com; Ken Rosenthal, FoxSports.com; Eno Sarris, FanGraphs; and Bill Arnold.
 
Association membership is open to any and all Internet baseball writers, with a $75 lifetime fee. Discounts for groups and scholarships are available. Members must be 18 years of age to apply.

For more information please visit 
www.ibwaa.com.

Contact:
 
Howard Cole
Founding Director, IBWAA
baseballsavvy@aol.com
 

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Yankee Doodle Dandies By Harvey Frommer

Yankee Doodle Dandies
   By Harvey Frommer



We are into January 2017 but come September THE ULTIMATE YANKEE BOOK by yours truly will make its debut. What follows is just a sampling of “ultimate” content. Enjoy. Reactions always welcomed.

Travel by Airplane        
          In 1946, the Yankees became the first team to regularly travel by airplane. The team leased a United Airlines plane nicknamed the "Yankee Mainliner.” Despite the advantages of flying, four players, including Red Ruffing, still chose to take the train.
                                                   
Mascot
The Yankees are one of four teams today lacking a mascot. From 1982 until 1985, the team mascot was Dandy, a pinstriped bird.  That did not work out.

Hideki Matsui
Before becoming a Yankee, Hideki Matsui recorded the second-longest consecutive games played streak in Japanese baseball history - 1,250 straight games.
                                                  
Elaine’s                
          George Steinbrenner liked to dine at Elaine's on Second Avenue in Manhattan. With his team at home, he would often partake of an early supper.

                                                  Mantle’s Locker
Yankee outfielder and future broadcaster Bobby Murcer took over Mickey Mantle's locker after “the Mick” retired in 1968

                              Yogi Berra, Mosts, a Partial List

            Most postseason games - Yogi Berra holds the record for appearing in the most postseason games - 75. In his 19 year career, Berra and the New York Yankees went to the postseason 14 times. Since Berra played during the years before divisional play, all of the games he appeared in were World Series games, meaning he also holds the record for most World Series games appeared in. The great Yankee also holds the record for most World Series at-bats with 259, and is third behind Mickey Mantle and Babe Ruth in World Series homeruns, with 12. 

                                  Yogi Berra, Everywhere!                                  
            Bill Bevens' No-Hitter Broken up By “Cookie” Lavagetto October 3, 1947; Yogi was there as the Yankees catcher.
          Sandy Amoros catch October 4, 1955; Yogi was there as Yankee catcher and smacked the ball that Amoros caught down the left field line.
            Don Larsen' perfect game, October 8, 1956; Yogi was the catcher.
           Bill Mazeroski's home run, October 13, 1960; Yogi was there as the Yankees left fielder.
          Home Run Number 61 by Roger Maris, October 1, 1961; Yogi was there as Yankee left fielder for part of the game.       
    Willie McCovey's line shot to Bobby Richardson, October 16, 1962; Yogi was there as a part time player on the bench.
 Chris Chambliss home run in ALCS, October 14, 1976, Yogi was there as Yankees coach.
Reggie Jackson's three home runs, October 18, 1977; Yogi was there as a Yankee coach.
           The Bucky Dent Home Run, October 2, 1978; Yogi was there as Yankees coach.
                      George Brett battles Goose Gossage, October 10, 1980, Yogi was there as Yankees coach.
            Yogi Berra was there after the Yankees fired Billy Martin on December 16, 1983 and took over as Yankee manager.
            David Cone's Perfect Game, July 19, 1999, Yogi was being honored on "Yogi Berra Day"
On the field, in the dugout, in the clubhouse, throwing out a first ball, Lawrence Peter Berra did his thing during the 2001 World Series.

Dr. Harvey Frommer, a professor at Dartmouth College in the MALS program, is in his 4ist year of writing books. A noted oral historian and sports journalist, he is the author of 43 sports books including the classics: best-selling “New York City Baseball, 1947-1957″ and best-selling Shoeless Joe and Ragtime Baseball,as well as his acclaimed Remembering Yankee Stadium and best-selling Remembering Fenway Park. His highly praised When It Was Just a Game: Remembering the First Super Bowl was published last fall.

A link to purchase autographed copies of Frommer Sports Books is at:   http://frommerbooks.com/