Thursday, May 31, 2018

            STILL More Yankee Quiz




You asked and now you receive – questions simple, weird, relevant, irrelevant, but all New York Yankees related.
Take the quiz and see how much you know.
From the “Stadium Club” to Babe Ruth’s Uniform Number to who owned the team before George Steinbrenner came along . . .

71. What is the significance of William S. Devery and Frank J. Farrell in the history of the franchise?
A. Willie Randolph B. Thurman Munson C. Dave Winfield D. Jerry Mumphrey
72.  How many times did George Steinbrenner hire and fire Billy Martin?
A. 4        B. 5    C. 6     D7  
73.   Who was the 20th manager in Steinbrenner’s time?
A. Billy Martin    B. Stump Merrill C.  C. Buck Showalter D. Joe Torre?
74. Who pitched the first no-hitter against the Yankees?
A. George Foster   B.  Cy Young C.    Bob Feller     D Hoyt Wilhelm
75.   Which former Yankees player went on to serve as president of the American League?
76.   Mickey Mantle was a rookie in 1951 but a different Yankee won Rookie of the Year. Who was he?
A. Gene Woodling   B Andy Carey   C.    Gil McDougald   D. Hank Bauer
77.  What Yankee in his first four years played on four world championship teams?
A. Joe DiMaggio B. Derek Jeter    C.     Yogi Berra    D. Lou Gehrig
78.  Two Yankees came to the major leagues without having played one game in the minors. Who were they?
79.   What Yankee was in the D-Day landing at Omaha Beach June 6, 1944?
A. Ralph Houk   B. Yogi Berra C. Jerry Coleman D. Hank Bauer
80. Bob Sheppard had the nick-name “Voice of God.” Who gave him the nickname?
A. Red Barber    B    Mel Allen    C. George Steinbrenner    D. Reggie Jackson
81.  Who had the idea to create the Yankee Stadium “Stadium Club”?
A.     Casey Stengel    B. Larry MacPhail    C. Dan Topping    D. Jake Ruppert
82.   After Lou Gehrig, who became the next captain?
A. Phil Rizzuto   B. Lefty Gomez   C. Mickey Mantle   D.  Thurman Munson
83. Which of the longest standing Yankee managers has the highest winning percentage?
A. Joe Torre    B. Joe McCarthy C. Casey Stengel   D. Buck Showalter
84.  The Yankees have the distinction of being the first to train outside of the USA. Where did the training take place?
       A. Bermuda   B.  Jamaica   C. Cuba     D. Dominican Republic  
 85.   All played for Yankees and Mets, aside from one. Who is he?
A. Lee Mazzilli      B. Gene Woodling C. Phil Linz    D. Rusty Stab   
86.   What Yankee recorded the most steals of home?
A. Mickey Mantle   B. Willie Randolph   C. Lou Gehrig   D. Ricky Henderson 
87.  Easy one – Babe Ruth’s uniform number?
88. Who hit the first home run in the new Yankee Stadium?
How did the Babe get the number?
89.  Another easy one. Who owned Yankees before the Steinbrenners?
90.   Joe DiMaggio played his entire career for the Yankees. What team did he coach for?
A. Cardinals     B. A’s        C. Padres            D. Dodgers
91.  When David Wells became a Yankee for the first time, what uniform number did he request and why?  
          Answers
71. They were owners of the Highlanders Yankees from (1903-1915).
72. –The magic number - - B. 5
73.   C. Buck Showalter
74.  B.  Cy Young
75.  Dr. Bobby Brown
76.  C. Gil McDougald
77.  A. Joe DiMaggio
78.  Catfish Hunter, Dave Winfield
79. Yogi Berra 
80.   D. Reggie Jackson
81.   B. Larry MacPhail
82.  D.  Thurman Munson
83.  B. Joe McCarthy, .627
84.    A. Bermuda, 1913
85.    D. Rusty Staub
86. C. Lou Gehrig, 15
87.  Three
88.  Babe Ruth  
89.  CBS
90.     B. A’s 
91.  Three was number he requested because it was number worn by Babe Ruth who he admired. The number has long been retired.
ABOUT  HARVEY FROMMER
One of the most prolific and respected sports journalists and oral historians in the United States, author of the autobiographies of legends Nolan Ryan,  Tony Dorsett, and Red Holzman, Dr. Harvey Frommer is an expert on the New York Yankees and has arguably written more books, articles and reviews on the New York Yankees than anyone.  A professor for more than two decades in the MALS program at Dartmouth College, Frommer was dubbed “Dartmouth’s Mr. Baseball” by their alumni magazine. He’s also the founder of www.HarveyFrommerSports.com. Some of the material in this piece was taken from his The Ultimate Yankee Book, readily available from the author or Amazon.


BONUS BOOKENDS:

The Away Game by Sebastian Abbot ( Norton, $26.95, 284 pages) is a worthy read focused in the main as its sub-title suggests on “the Epic Search for Soccer’s Next Superstars.” Joy, frustration, anger, exhilaration and more intermingle in the book’s pages as we are there with the boys of  Senegal, Ghana, other countries of Africa all involved in the quests of their lives.
Encyclopedia Blazertannica by Roger  Bennett and Michael Davies (Knopf, 27.95   208 pages) is the ultimate guide to soccer America’s sport of the future since 1972. The gang’s all here in this penultimate look at the game, its epic moments, marvelous heroes and legends in a book with humor, perceptions, asides, trivia, extended narrative, opinions as only the two Englishmen who have their own show on NBC sports among other venues of exposure can provide. If the great game is your thing and even if it is not, get a copy      

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

More Yankee Quiz - Test Your Yankee Knowledge!


More Yankee Quiz

by Harvey Frommer

You asked and now you receive – questions simple, weird, relevant, irrelevant, but all New York Yankees related.
 Take the quiz and see how much you know.


51. Who wore uniform Number 2 before Derek Jeter?

52. Who originally designed the intertwined Yankees logo, “NY”?
      A. Jake Ruppert B. NYC Police Department C. Tiffany D. A fan

53.   First-baseman Wally Pipp has gone down in history for being the       player Lou Gehrig replaced. What other distinction belongs to Pipp?
A. He was a manager.  B. He came from the same neighborhood Gehrig grew up in.  C. He was a home run champ.  D. He made money endorsing aspirin.


54. Who was the first major leaguer to hit two grand slams in the same game? 


55.    Who played the most games for the Yankees?
  A. Mickey Mantle    B.  Yogi Berra    C.  Lou Gehrig    55. D.  Derek Jeter

56. Who was the first DH to bat? (He was a Yankee)


57. Who was the highest paid Yankee in 1973?


58.  Which pitcher became the highest-paid player in history when he signed a $3.5 million contract for the Yankees in 1975?


59. – What Yankee pitcher was nick-named “Bulldog”? 
A.  Jim Bouton B. Monte Pearson C.  Joe Page D. Ron Guidry


60. The tradition of honoring legends at Yankee Stadium started on Memorial Day of 1932. Who was the first monument for? 

61. How many games did Babe Ruth win as pitcher for the Yankees?



62.   Name the Yankees outfielder who won the 1962 AL Rookie of the Year Award when he batted .286 with 20 home runs and 93 RBI.  


63.  For seven consecutive years a New York Mayor threw out the first pitch for the home opener of the Yankees. Who was he?

64. What number did Earl Combs wear and why?

65.  What year did the Yankees begin playing Frank Sinatra’s “New York, New York” at the Stadium?


66. Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, Bernie Williams each spent more than a decade playing centerfield for the Yankees. Who spent the most time?


67. What year did the first All Star Game take place at Yankee Stadium?


68.   Who was the first black player on the Yankees?


69.  Who said: “I may not have been the greatest Yankee to put on the uniform, but I am the proudest.”


70.  Who wrote “New York, New York” the song sung by Frank Sinatra at the Stadium?




                       ANSWERS BELOW


No PEEKING

51.  A.  Mike Gallego wore it in 1992, 1993 and 1994
52.  C.  The interlocking NY logo was originally designed by Louis C. Tiffany for the NYPD valor medal.
53.   C. Pipp was an American League home run champion in 1916-17.
54.  D. Tony Lazzeri
55. D.  Derek Jeter, 2,747
56.  B. Ron Blomberg  
57.  B. Bobby Murcer made $100,000. Alou and Lyle made $70,000. Stottlemyre earned $78,000
58.  Jim "Catfish" Hunter
59. A. Jim Bouton because of his overbearing nature
60.  B. Miller Huggins
61. C. five and two were complete games.
62.  Tom Tresh 
63.  C. Fiorello LaGuadia    (1939-45)
64.  A. 1 because he batted first in a Yankee lineup that began the practice of wearing numbers.
65.  D. 1980
66.  B. Mantle, 15 years
67.  C.   1939, to coincide with the World’s Fair that year
68.  April 14, 1955, the second game of the year, Elston Howard debuted.
69.  D.  Billy Martin
70.   B. Kander and Ebb


About
Harvey
Frommer
One of the most prolific and respected sports journalists and oral historians in the United States, author of the autobiographies of legends Nolan Ryan, Tony Dorsett, and Red Holzman, Dr. Harvey Frommer is an expert on the New York Yankees and has arguably written more books, articles and reviews on the New York Yankees than anyone.  A professor for more than two decades in the MALS program at Dartmouth College, Frommer was dubbed “Dartmouth’s Mr. Baseball” by their alumni magazine. He’s also the founder of www.HarveyFrommerSports.com. Some of the material in this piece was taken from his The Ultimate Yankee Book, readily available from the author or Amazon.

http://www.frommerbooks.com/ultimate-yankees.html

Sunday, May 6, 2018

Remembering Ted Williams - Harvey Frommer

Remembering Ted Williams



He was called “the Splendid Splinter,” “the Kid,” “Teddy Ballgame” and other unmentionable names. But Ted Williams was always something else.

There was the love-hate affair fans at Fenway Park had with Ted Williams.  He dropped  a fly ball in the first game of a doubleheader. Raucous razzing followed.  In the second game, a ball scooted past him in left field, and he made a half hearted effort to go after it. Three runs scored. The booing was deafening. The inning ended. Williams came to the dugout, stopped and made a negative, some would say, obscene gesture --  twice.

ROGER KAHN: Every once in a while, Williams would lose his temper and give them the finger. People out in left field would jeer. There was a constant clash between Williams and the customers.    
BOB BRADY:  But in those years he was the only reason to go to Fenway Park. As soon as his last at bat many would depart especially if the Sox were losing. 
ROGER KAHN: At that time, the Red Sox clubhouse  closed something like 40 minutes before a game at the request, no the demand of  Williams who called reporters the “Knights of the Keyboard.” 
There were more bodies than you could imagine in the Fenway press box, people from all of the papers.  Platoons of reporters.  Somebody doing the pregame color—this is when the Yankees came in.  Somebody doing the dressing room   Somebody doing the other dressing room  Somebody doing crowd notes.  Somebody doing the game itself.  
IKE DELOCK:   He didn’t like the press and there a lot were a lot them – he wanted to ban them from the clubhouse. The players said, “You can’t do that.”  So he eased up.  But whatever he wanted he damn well got.
        At the urging of Williams, Red Sox players agreed to a one hour interview lag after games before reporters could enter the locker room. The Sox icon would stand outside the door wearing just a towel, counting off the seconds. “Okay,” he'd snap. “Now all you bastards can come in. “
MEL PARNELL:  Ted was called out on strikes and came back to the dugout and complained that home plate was out of line. General manager Joe Cronin argued about it but agreed to have home plate checked. At nine the next morning the ground crew was out there. They checked. It was out of line. Ted had the greatest eyes. He was a man with strong opinions about everything, and his own way of doing things.
The “Splendid Splinter” ordered postal scales for the Boston clubhouse to accurately measure the weight of his bats. He trusted no one. While in the on-deck circle, he would massage his bat handle with olive oil and resin. The noise, a kind of squeal, did not endear him to disconcerted pitchers. He was one of the greatest, one of a kind, an original.

About

Harvey

Frommer


One of the most prolific and respected sports journalists and oral historians in the United States, author of the autobiographies of legends Nolan Ryan, Tony Dorsett, and Red Holzman,
 A professor for more than two decades in the MALS program at Dartmouth College, Frommer was dubbed “Dartmouth’s Mr. Baseball” by their alumni magazine. He’s also the founder of www.HarveyFrommerSports.com.
His highly successful THE ULTIMATE YANKEE BOOK is readily available from the author or  Amazon.   http://www.frommerbooks.com/ultimate-yankees.html

Sunday, April 29, 2018

From “the Captain” to "Friday Night Massacre"


From “the Captain” to "Friday Night Massacre"


The Bronx Bombers alias the New York Yankees, the most successful franchise in baseball history has a corner on lots of things including nick-names. For your reading pleasure, a sampling of nom de plumes, aliases, sobriquets, catch words and of course nick-names,
"The Captain" - Derek Jeter - was such an icon that the Yankees have yet to name a new Captain one since his retirement.
          “Captain Clutch” - Derek Jeter, that he was
          "Chairman of the Board" - Elston Howard coined it for Whitey Ford and his commanding and take charge manner on the mound.
            ''Carnesville Plowboy'' - Spud Chandler, for his hometown of Carnesville,
           “The CAT-a-lyst" - Mickey Rivers, given this name by Howard Cosell. 
"Georgia Catfish" - James Augustus Hunter was his real name but the world knew him as “Catfish,” primarily because of Oakland A's owner Charles O. Finley. Finley. Hunter ran away from home when he was a child, returning with two catfish. His parents called him Catfish for a while. Finley decided that Jim Hunter was too bland a name a star pitcher and revived Hunter's childhood nickname.
            "Columbia Lou" - Lou Gehrig, for his collegiate roots.
.            "Commerce Comet" - Mickey Mantle, for his speed and being out of Commerce, Oklahoma.
          “The Colonel” - Jerry Coleman saw combat in both World War II and the Korean War, As a Marine Corps aviator, he flew 120 combat missions and earned two Distinguished Flying Crosses.
          It was also a nickname for pitching coach Jim Turner who came from the south and used by Jim Bouton in Ball Four in a derogatory fashion.
          "The Count" - Sparky Lyle, handlebar mustache and lordly ways
            "The Count" – John Montefusco, because his name reminded people of the Count of Monte Crisco. 
“Core Four” Andy Pettitte, Mariano Rivera, Derek Jeter and Jorge Posada were all drafted or signed as amateurs by the Yankees in the early 1990s. After playing in the minors together they made their debuts in 1995. With the four as a nucleus, the Yanks in the next 17 seasons missed the playoffs only twice, played in the World Series seven times, won five world championships.
"The Crow" - Frank Crosetti loud voice and chirpy ways.
 "Curse of the Bambino" - Since 1920 and the selling of Babe Ruth to the Yankees by Boston owner Harry Frazee in 1920, the Yankees have won all those championships. The Red Sox have won a few.      
            "Daddy Longlegs" - Dave Winfield, for his size and long legs.
             "Danish Viking" - George Pipgras, for his size and roots
            "Deacon" - Everett Scott, for his not too friendly look.
   "Death Valley" - the old deep centerfield in Yankee Stadium.
          "Dial-a-Deal - Gabe Paul, for his telephone trading habits.
"Donnie Baseball" - Don Mattingly’s nickname. Some say it was coined by Yankee broadcaster Michael Kay; others say it came from Kirby Puckett. Kay takes the credit; Mattingly gives the credit to Puckett.
            "Ellie"   - Affectionate abbreviation of Elston Howard's first name     
              "El Duquecito" – Adrian Hernandez because of a pitching style similar to Orlando "El Duque."
 "Father of the Emory Ball" - Rookie right-hander Russ Ford posted a 26-6 record with 8 shutouts, 1910, using that pitch.
            “Figgy” – Ed Figueroa, short for his surname which was tough, for some, to pronounce
            "Five O'clock Lightning" - At five o'clock the blowing of a whistle at a factory near Yankee Stadium signaled the end of the work day in the 1930s and also the power the Yankees were unleashing against opponents on the Yankee Stadium playing field.  
          “Fireman" - Johnny Murphy, the first to have this nick-name was the first great relief pitcher. Joe Page picked up this nick-name for his top relief work later on.              
            “Flash" - Joe Gordon was fast, slick fielding and hit line drives.
“Flop Ears” - Julie Wera. Was dubbed that by Babe Ruth. A backup infielder, Wera earned $2400, least on the ‘27 Yankees
Yankees,"Fordham Johnny" - for the college Johnny Murphy attended.
 “Four hour manager" - Bucky Harris, who put his time in at the game and was finished.
            "Friday Night Massacre" - April 26, 1974, Yankees Fritz Patterson, Steve Kline, Fred Beene, Tom Buskey, and half the pitching staff were traded to Cleveland for Chris Chambliss, Dick Tidrow, and Ceil Upshaw.
One of the most prolific and respected sports journalists and oral historians in the United States, author of the autobiographies of legends Nolan Ryan, Tony Dorsett, and Red Holzman, Dr. Harvey Frommer is an expert on the New York Yankees and has arguably written more books, articles and reviews on the New York Yankees than anyone. In 2010, he was honored by the City of New York to serve as historical consultant for the re-imagined old Yankee Stadium site, Heritage Field
 A professor for more than two decades in the MALS program at Dartmouth College, Frommer was dubbed “Dartmouth’s Mr. Baseball” by their alumni magazine. He’s also the founder of www.HarveyFrommerSports.com.
His highly successful THE ULTIMATE YANKEE BOOK is readily available from the author or  Amazon.   http://www.frommerbooks.com/ultimate-yankees.html

Thursday, April 12, 2018

REMEMBERING JERRY COLEMAN By Harvey Frommer


REMEMBERING JERRY COLEMAN
By Harvey Frommer

                             




"The Yankees were not our team, they were our religion." –Jerry Coleman  
          My connection to Jerry Coleman goes all the way back to 1975 when I was researching and interviewing for my first book - - A Baseball Century: the First Hundred Years of the National League.
                I met him in San Diego where he was a broadcaster and did a very in depth interview with the charming baseball lifer. I sat in the stands with him after the gamer was over and he talked and talked. He suggested that someone should do a book on baseball in New York City in the 1940s and 1950s, a time he played there, a time he called "the last golden age."
             My New York City Baseball: 1947-1957 was published and has gone through several reprints and is still around and I have Jerry Coleman to thank for the idea.
         Gerald Francis Coleman was born on September 14, 1924 in San Jose, California. He was hooked on baseball, he told me, from the time he could walk.  In 1942, Coleman was signed off the California sandlots by the Yankees and sent to Class D Pony League, the Wellsville Yankees.
       World War II interrupted his baseball career. He became a 19-year-old fighter   pilot who over three years flew 57 bombing missions in campaigns over the Solomon Islands, Guadalcanal, the Philippines. Coleman was awarded two Distinguished Flying Crosses and seven Air Medals.
          War ended, in 1946, Coleman began to climb his way up through the Yankee farm system.
    JERRY COLEMAN: Spring training of 1948 I was trying to make the Yankees.  I was the last man cut. I played for the Newark Bears in the International League and came up to the Yankees at the end of the season.
        On April 20, 1949, Coleman made his rookie debut as the regular Yankee second baseman He led all who played his position in fielding that season through 1951. He was selected third as the Sporting News and Associated Press American League Rookie of the Year in 1949.
           “The best second baseman I ever saw on the double play,” according to his manager Casey Stengel, Coleman played nine seasons for the Yankees and with Phil Rizzuto formed a celebrated double-play combination.
       JERRY COLEMAN:  It wasn't money then, it was winning or losing. If you came in second place, you lost. It was the glory of winning and the ring. People watched the Yankees and admired the pride of the Yankees. But unfortunately the Yankees became so successful, people hated them for their success.
            Going north from spring training, we'd pass through small towns and people would be out there early in the morning as the train went by, waving to us. I don't know how they got the word - but we'd be having our breakfast in the diner and they'd be there.
Arguably Coleman’s top season was 1950 when he batted a career best .287, and set a team record for double plays by a second baseman. An All Star that 1950 season, the adroit infielder was the World Series Most Valuable Player.
           In May 1952, Coleman was called back to active duty and transferred to Korea to the 323 Marine Attack Squadron. Flying 120 missions, earning six more Air Medals, he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel.
          The Yankees staged a day for him September 13, 1953 when he returned from active duty. Nearly 50,000 showed at the Stadium. Back as a Yankee, the time in Korea had taken something out of him as he admitted. Coleman was never the same ball player.  
          Playing career ended, the “Colonel” joined the Yankees front office after the 1957 season and then moved into the Yankees broadcast booth from 1963-1969.        A member of six Yankee pennant winning teams, the man who also graced baseball broadcast booths for decades, Jerry Coleman is the only Major League Baseball player who was in combat duty in two wars. 
       He truly was an officer, a gentleman and a splendid baseball player despite losing so many seasons out of his nine year Yankee career to military service for his country.
One of the most prolific and respected sports journalists and oral historians in the United States, author of the autobiographies of legends Nolan Ryan, Tony Dorsett, and Red Holzman, Dr. Harvey Frommer is an expert on the New York Yankees and has arguably written more books, articles and reviews on the New York Yankees than anyone. In 2010, he was honored by the City of New York to serve as historical consultant for the re-imagined old Yankee Stadium site, Heritage Field.
A professor for more than two decades in the MALS program at Dartmouth College, Frommer was dubbed “Dartmouth’s Mr. Baseball” by their alumni magazine. He’s also the founder of www.HarveyFrommerSports.com.
His latest The Ultimate Yankee Book can be ordered direct from the author and is easily available on Amazon. http://www.frommerbooks.com/ultimate-yankees.html

Thursday, March 22, 2018

FLASHBACK - First Opening Day at Fenway Park

FLASHBACK
First Opening Day at Fenway Park


By Harvey Frommer

  It was damp and chilly throughout New England for most of the spring of 1912, and in Boston, it took a few tries before baseball at a brand new ballpark could be played in decent weather.
On April 9th, the Red Sox and Harvard's baseball team met in an exhibition game in football weather and as one who was there observed, “with a little snow on the side.” About 3,000 braved the elements. Boston won the game, 2-0 with both runs driven in by their pitcher, Casey Hageman.
        The scheduled official Opening Day match on April 12th, however, was rained out. Finally on April 20th, the weather improved a bit, and Fenway's first major league game: the Sox versus the Yankees (then known as the Highlanders), was set to be played before a crowd of 27,000 on soggy, lumpy grounds and infield grass transplanted from the Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds, the team’s former home.
Boston Mayor John "Honey Fitz" Fitzgerald threw out the ceremonial first ball. The man, whose grandson would become the thirty-fifth president of the United States, was an ardent member of the "Royal Rooters" - a group of Red Sox fans who staged pre-game parades accompanied by the singing of "Tessie" and "Sweet Adeline."
Ordinarily the game would have been the stuff of front-page headlines in New England dailies. Six days earlier, however, the largest passenger ship in the world had struck an iceberg and gone down in the icy waters of the Atlantic.  The news of the sinking of the Titanic on its maiden voyage and the accompanying loss of 1,517 lives would eclipse all other stories.
        Nevertheless, it was good news in Boston that the Red Sox finally had a modern ballpark. The original field that the team -- then known as the Boston Somersets -- played on was a former circus lot where sand covered much of the outfield and a tool shed sat in the middle of centerfield.
Owner General Charles Henry Taylor, a Civil War veteran and owner of the "Boston Globe," had decided back in 1910 to build a new ballpark in the Fenway section bordering Brookline Avenue, Jersey Street, Van Ness Street and Lansdowne Street. It would cost $650,000 (approximately $14 million today), and seat 35,000. Ground was broken September 25, 1911.
An attractive red brick fa├žade, the first electric baseball scoreboard, and 18 turnstiles, the most in the Majors, were all features being talked about.  Concrete stands went from behind first base around to third while wooden bleachers were located in parts of left, right, and centerfield. Seats lined the field allowing for excellent views of the game but limiting the size of foul territory.
Elevation was 20 feet above sea level. Barriers and walls broke off at different angles. Centerfield was 488 feet from home plate; right field was 314 feet away. The 10-foot wooden fence in left field ran straight along Lansdowne Street and was but 320 ½ feet down the line from home plate with a high wall behind it.  There was a ten foot embankment making viewing of games easier for overflow gatherings. A ten foot high slope in left field posed challenges for outfielders who had to play the entire territory running uphill.
This was the Opening Day Lineup for the 1912 Boston Red Sox.
RF
2B
CF
1B
3B
LF
SS
C
P
        The Sox, with player-manager first baseman Jake Stahl calling the shots, won the game, 7-6, in 11 innings. Tris Speaker -- who that season would bat .383, steal 52 bases and stroke eight inside-the-park home runs at Fenway -- drove in the winning run. Spitball pitcher Bucky O’Brien was the winner in relief of Charles “Sea Lion” Hall. The first hit in the park belonged to New York's Harry Wolter.  
        And that was how it all began.
BOOKENDS:  Tom Yawkey: Patriarch of the Boston Red Sox by Bill Nowlin (University of Nebraska Press, $36.95, 531 pages) is a masterwork on the long-time BoSox owner that is long over-due. And Nowlin, whose resume includes almost 40 books on the Sox and a multitude of articles, has truly out-done himself. 
Nowlin writes in his intro: “As I began to write a biography of Tom Yawkey, I was surprised to learn how little had ever been written about him.”
        Now we have a lot written about the man who owned the team from 1933 to 1976. Complete, well written, filled with fascinating new information, Tom Yawkey: Patriarch of the Boston Red Sox is a must read for fans of the franchise and all those interested in baseball history. Warts and all Tom Yawkey and his time comes to life. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED    
=============================================
        Harvey Frommer is one of the most prolific and respected sports journalists and oral historians in the United States, author of the autobiographies of legends Nolan Ryan, Tony Dorsett, and Red Holzman, Dr. Harvey has been a professor for more than two decades in the MALS program at Dartmouth College, Frommer was dubbed “Dartmouth’s Mr. Baseball” by their alumni magazine. He’s also the founder of www.HarveyFrommerSports.com. His The Ultimate Yankee Book is available on Amazon or directly from the author.